About Us

The Pulse Project offers a broad range of freely accessible podcasts on the past and present of Science and Medicine for both general and specialised audiences, aiming to reflect and inform debates amongst academics, students, and the wider public alike.

Podcasts can be accessed anywhere, anytime, by anyone. As popular as they are now also prolific, podcasts have created a vibrant space for the academic to interact with peers as well as reach out to wider, new audiences. The Pulse Project aspires to facilitate this exchange of ideas by providing a free online resource specialising in the sciences and medical humanities, and currently attracts some 50k visitors a month. It has also become a hub for related activities by supporting and hosting two podcast series on Math/Maths andStrange Quarksas well as the Expert Explanations audio encyclopaedia. Our podcasts can also be accessed through Itunes, are advertised along with event notices on our facebook page, and a hopefully soon larger selection feature in our content partnership with TES.

   The speed with which the Pulse Project has evolved speaks to its ability to showcase fellow researchers and the synergies between biomedical and historical research, as well as its utility in enhancing students' learning experiences by augmenting reading lists or, more pratically, through teaching transferable skills in audio and video editing to those interested. So, if you are a student and want to record events, edit the podcasts and earn a bit towards your fees, please get in touch and we'll have a chat about it.

   We are, of course, also always keen to enrich our Expert Explanations, the audio reinvention of the encyclopaedia with 4-8 minute, general introductions to key terms, theories, or landmarks in the sciences and medical humanities. Expert Explanation do not necessarily, but preferably can include any number of links to further print or media resources, your books, and so on. They are academically outstanding encyclopaedic entries on a broad range of topics from evolution to eugenics, the atom to zoology, so please get in touch if you could contribute up to two entries on anything in your area of expertise.

Of course, do not hesitate with any questions or comments you may have!

Tudor Georgescu (tgeorgescu@brookes.ac.uk)

Colin Murphy (colin@pulse-project.com)


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Colin Murphy

Colin Murphy

Colin Murphy studied psychology at University College Dublin, where he learned how much he enjoyed science and different areas of popular science. He went on to study Cognitive Neuro-psychology at Oxford Brookes University. While in Oxford he enjoyed the constant flow of lectures available, but dismayed by lack of time to see them all. As a Psychology teacher at various colleges he enjoys his role in communicating science and inspiring others to learn more. The Pulse Project is a chance to learn and deliver high quality science to the public and learn in the process. He is a member of the British Science Association in Oxford. He is a director of Pulse Project and has seen it develop from a struggling idea to a successful public resource.

 

Tudor Georgescu

Tudor Georgescu

Tudor Georgescu is currently a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow on the Wellcome Trust funded Programme Grant investigating 'Disputed Bodies: Subject's narratives of medical research in Europe, 1940-2001' at Oxford Brookes University, and an Associate Lecturer of the Department of History, Philosophy and Religion and its Centre for Health Medicine and Society. Tudor's core research interests revolve around the emergence of eugenic and fascist movements amongst interwar German ethnic minorities more widely, and the Transylvanian Saxons in Romania in particular. Expanding on these research themes into how cultural and biological approaches to identity construction were moulded and managed by political and medical ideologies, his current research looks into the more contemporary and equally contentious issues surrounding reproductive medicine and the spectre of 'bioslavery' as conceptual tools and cultural points of reference in a rapidly changing biotechnological landscape. See Profile.

 

Robert Smith

Robert Smith

Robert Smith studied chemistry at Sheffield University, specialising in theoretical modelling of organometalic catalysts and their physical properties. He met Colin over a phad thai in Thame & offered his time and effort to get the Pulse Project from idea to reality by building the orginal website. As the content grew he has continued to support the project & recently completed the latest redesign of the site. In his day job he currently works as a Senior Scientist in R&D for P&G working on pre and post shave products.

 

 

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