New Conf Podcasts: Intercultural Humanism podcasts migrate across from the 'Berendel Foundation'

The Pulse Project is pleased to announce that all of the following podcasts originally produced and hosted by The Berendel Foundation have now migrated to the Pulse Project, and span most all of the papers presented to the conference:

"Intercultural Humanism: Challenges, Experiences, Visions, Strategies"

9-12 September 2010, Christ Church College, Oxford

 

First Annual Conference of The Berendel Foundation, in association with the University of Oxford

 

Podcasts:

•Conference, Opening Reception

     Sorin Antohi, Opening Remarks

     HRH Prince Radu of Romania, Cantemir: Inspired Leadership (at 10min)

      and conferral of the first Cantemir Prize introduced by Sorin Antohi (at 20min)

     Ștefan Lemny, Acceptance Speech (at 23min)

     Jörn Rüsen, Intercultural Humanism: A Vision and Its Reality (at 26 min)

•Alex Goody, Gender, Humanism and Technology

•Armin Heinen, The 'Instrumentalisation' of the Dead Body? Organ  Donation as a Challenge to Human Cultures

•Erhard Reckwitz, Otherness? Towards an Intercultural Literary Anthropology

•Kirill Thompson, Lessons from Early Chinese Humanist Impulses

•Chen Chao-ying, Human Being as Species Being: A Reconsideration of Xunzi's Humanism

•Ming Xie, Harmony: Concepts, Practices, Intercultural Hermeneutics

•Chintamani Yogi, Intercultural Humanism and Value-Oriented Education

•Zhang Xinhua, Globalisation, Human Collective Learning, and the Appeal of Intercultural Humanism: Driving forces and Contemplations (in the 21st Century)

•Hardy Schloer, Quantum Relations, Global Intelligence, and the Information and Communications Technologies of the Future

•Umesh Chattopadhyaya, Indian Humanism in an Intercultural Perspective

•M. Satish Kumar, Buddhism and Intercultural Humanism: An Exploration in Context

•Michael Onyebuchi Eze, Ubuntu: Ideology or Promise?

•Virgil Nemoianu, Tradition, the Beautiful, and the Uncertainties of Global Humanism  

•Soring Antohi, Closing Remarks

 

Further Information on the Conference:

 

Please note that these podcasts where originally produced and hosted by The Berendel Foundation, and migrated to the Pulse Project in June 2013

 

"Intercultural Humanism: Challenges, Experiences, Visions, Strategies"

9 September, 2010 - 12 September, 2010

Christ Church College University of Oxford

 

Convened by The Berendel Foundation in association with the Modern European History Research Centre, University of Oxford

This conference marks the Berendel Foundation’s inaugural event and aspires to propose, explore, and promote the principles and practices of intercultural humanism as a more inclusive vision for humanity. In doing so, the conference’s conclusions and recommendations will inform the elaboration of the Berendel Foundation’s concrete short and medium-term agendas to further its intellectual ambitions and emerging global network.

 

Why Intercultural Humanism?

The old humanism in the West, rooted in the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian traditions, has played and continues to play a significant role in today’s world. Yet the extreme forms of Western modernism, such as communism and fascism, and the more recent, radical forms of postmodernism have attempted to discredit it, thereby weakening it considerably. At the same time, the current processes of globalization have revealed that the old humanistic model, aiming at universalism, ecumenism, and the globalization of various Western Christian and secular systems of values and beliefs--even when pleading for an ever-wider inclusion of other cultural perspectives and for intercultural dialogue--is no longer adequate in dealing with the current global conditions. Although we would be wise to retain a number of its assumptions and practices--which, incidentally, they share with the other major cultural traditions outside the Western world, such as the Jainist, Buddhist, Confucianist, Daoist, Islamic, Byzantine traditions, to give but a few examples--we must now reconsider and remap it in terms of a larger, global reference frame. The conference organizers believe that this new, global and intercultural, humanism must be based on the principles and practices of global intelligence, defined as the ability and willingness to understand, respond to, and work toward what will benefit all human beings and will support and enrich all life on this planet. Indeed, intercultural humanism involves developing and practicing a new, trans-disciplinary, intercultural ‘science’: the science of being human.

 

Our Vision.

Our societies are increasingly interdependent. Nation-states are fast becoming a global marketplace of finance, information, and technology. These forces are reshaping our daily lives, our languages, ideas, cultures, ethics, environment, trade, and systems of values and beliefs. Changes are occurring at uncomfortable speeds without a clear vision of where the momentum will take us. Life itself, its challenges and possibilities must now be addressed from a global viewpoint. But where are the sources of intercultural dialogue and cross-disciplinary, integrative, and globally responsible thinking? How can young scholars and practitioners from various regions of the world be called to learn together about a shared future? Who is training the leaders, decision-makers, and civic entrepreneurs of tomorrow? And, most urgently, how do we change the current course of humanity, which by most reliable scientific accounts appears to be headed toward ecological overstress and increased, self-inflicted suffering?

The existing structures of global communication, interaction, and governance, have so far proven only partially effective in dealing with these questions, confined as they are by a world-view governed by the nation-state, which is unable to cope with the realities of an interconnected globe. The Berendel Foundation and its emerging global network propose to offer an alternative to the “clash-of-nations” or “clash-of-civilizations” approach, by working toward remapping our current fields of knowledge, modes of communication, as well as political and socioeconomic structures from the perspective of an intercultural, global humanism based on the emergent ethics of global intelligence.

 

Our Mission.

The central mission of the Berendel Foundation is to help develop, promote, and support the various philosophies, ethics, and practices that are conducive to global intelligence and intercultural humanism based on dialogue. Its founding members believe that this mission can best be carried out by creating an extensive global network of intercultural research, learning, and advocacy centers in cooperation with some of the best institutions of learning and research as well as other business, governmental, nongovernmental, civic, and religious institutions, organizations, and networks throughout the world. This conference builds on many years of collaborative initiatives and projects under various auspices and with diverse institutional bases, undertaken by many of the participants. Time has come for all those pioneering efforts to blend into an ambitious global project.

 

Format of Inaugural Conference.

The discussions will be organized around seven key themes that necessarily overlap, complement each other, and form a medium-term agenda that is to be explored by the Foundation’s network. Starting from their individual areas of expertise, positions, and visions, participants are to address the themes while concentrating on specific topics. Intensive discussions, both formal and informal, will result in suggestions and recommendations for the further work of the Foundation’s network, envisaged over an extended period.

1st theme:The definitions and history of humanism, Western and non-Western. The interrelations, commonalities, differences, and convergences among humanistic traditions in various parts of the world; their relevance today and in future trends; attacks against humanism during the modern and the postmodern periods; the theory and practice of anti-humanism; pseudo-humanisms; humanism, ideology, utopia, and politics.

2nd theme:Principles and practices of intercultural humanism; ethics of global intelligence.

3rd theme:Global learning environments, organizations, networks, institutions needed to develop and promote intercultural humanism.

4th theme:Intercultural humanism and the information and communication technologies needed to create a genuinely diverse global culture.

5th theme:Humanism and religion: Issues of faith and interfaith in relationship to intercultural humanism.

6th theme: The role of intercultural humanism in encouraging the kind of holistic, organic, biological and other sciences that will contribute to a better stewardship of our planet’s natural resources and ecology.

7th theme: Intercultural humanism and the perennial wisdom (early Buddhism, Daoism, Sufism, Pythagoreanism, etc): The relevance of this wisdom to the development of global intelligence on the planet; modalities of re-actualizing, remapping, and disseminating this wisdom to devise viable solutions for the most pressing global issues.

 

Conference Programme

 

Friday, 10 September

Christ Church College

McKenna Room

 

09:30-11:00 Panel One

Chair: Marius Turda

Mihai Spariosu, Intercultural Humanism and Global Intelligence: Principles and Practices Roger Griffin, Homo Humanistus: Towards an Inventory of Transcultural Humanism

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break

 

11:30-13:00 Panel Two

Chair:Stefan Jordan

Robert Evans, European Humanism: East and West Zhang Longxi, Humanism at the Meeting Place of Cultures: Reflections from an East-West Perspective Monika Baár, Humanism and Historiography

13:00-14:30 Lunch (Christ Church College, Great Hall)

 

14:30-16:00 Panel Three

Chair: Virgil Nemoianu

Alex Goody, Gender, Humanism and Technology Erhard Reckwitz, Otherness? Towards an Intercultural Literary Anthropology Armin Heinen, The 'Instrumentalisation' of the Dead Body? Organ Donation as a Challenge to Human Cultures

16:00-16:30 Coffee Break

 

16:30-18:00 Panel Four

Chair: Zhang Longxi

Kirill Thompson, Lessons from Early Chinese Humanist Impulses Chen Chao-ying, Human Being as Species Being: A Reconsideration of Xunzi's Humanism Ming Xie, Harmony: Concepts, Practices, Intercultural Hermeneutics

 

Saturday, 11 September

Christ Church College

Lecture Room 2

 

09:30-11:00 Panel Five

Chair: Mihai Spariosu

Chintamani Yogi, Intercultural Humanism and Value-Oriented Education Zhang Xinhua, Globalisation, Human Collective Learning, and the Appeal of Intercultural Humanism: Driving forces and Contemplations (in the 21st Century) Hardy Schloer, Quantum Relations, Global Intelligence, and the Information and Communications Technologies of the Future

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break

 

11:30-13:00 Panel Six

Chair: Jörn Rüsen

Umesh Chattopadhyaya, Indian Humanism in an Intercultural Perspective M. Satish Kumar, Buddhism and Intercultural Humanism: An Exploration in Context Michael Onyebuchi Eze, Ubuntu: Ideology or Promise?

13:00-14:30 Lunch Buffet

 

14:30-16:00 Panel Seven

Chair: Roger Griffin

Mikhail Epstein, Humanology Gheorghe Ștefan, Integral Humanism Virgil Nemoianu, Tradition, the Beautiful, and the Uncertainties of Global Humanism

16:00-16:30 Coffee Break

 

16:30-17:30 Concluding Session

Chair: Sorin Antohi

 

 

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